Wednesday night's full worm moon will be the last supermoon of 2019

Wednesday night's full worm moon will be the last supermoon of 2019

Wednesday night's full worm moon will be the last supermoon of 2019

It will be the last of a trio of supermoons that kicked off the first three months of 2019.

What is a super worm moon?

A supermoon is a moon that is full when it's at perigee - the spot in its orbit where it's closest to the Earth. The phenomenon happens twice a year- once as autumn equinox in September and the other in March as spring equinox.

The next super moon will not occur until February 2020, according to CNET.

As with all celestial events, it pays to be away from bright city lights which have a tendency to pollute the night sky. The equinox happens at 3:58 p.m. MT, while the full moon and supermoon will show at 7:43 p.m. MT, according to EarthSky.

While engaging in spring festivities, remember, the "early bird" gets to see the "Super Worm Moon". But seriously, a "worm moon" is the nickname given to the first full moon in March as it's the time of year when the ground begins to thaw in the northern hemisphere and earthworms resurface.


Some Native American tribes also referred to this moon as the Full Crow Moon when the cawing of crows signaled the end of winter, or the Full Sap Moon, marking the time of tapping maple trees.

Why is it called a Full Worm Moon?

"Its closest point is the perigee, which is an average distance of about 226,000 miles (363,300 kilometers) from Earth". Also used to describe it: Crow Moon and Lenten Moon.

The arrival of spring and the supermoon will also almost coincide with an asteroid passing close to Earth, according to the Minor Planet Center.

If you want to avoid the possibility of clouds interfering with your view Wednesday evening in Washington, Tuesday night's moon is pretty close to full at 96 percent or greater illumination.

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