Deputy AG Rod Rosenstein expected to leave Justice Department in mid-March

Deputy AG Rod Rosenstein expected to leave Justice Department in mid-March

Deputy AG Rod Rosenstein expected to leave Justice Department in mid-March

Barr faced numerous questions during his confirmation hearing about whether he would continue the Mueller probe and publish its findings.

The departing deputy attorney general has come under frequent criticism from Trump, most recently Monday when the president tweeted that Rosenstein and former acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe engaged in a "treasonous" plot to remove him via the 25th Amendment.

Even if Mueller goes away, Trump's problems have no end in sight. Mueller, who is investigating allegations of collusion between the Trump campaign and Russian Federation, reported directly to Rosenstein until November of a year ago, when Trump appointed Matt Whitaker as the acting attorney general. A departure next month could potentially serve as another signal that Mueller's work is coming to a close.

US President Donald Trump, responding to the CNN report, noted that decision rested with Mr Barr. He has pointed, however, to Justice Department practices that insist on saying little or nothing about conduct that does not lead to criminal charges.

It's not clear how much of that report will be released to the public or Congress, if any of it is released at all.

Barr continued in his hearing that "the attorney general as I understand the rules, would report to Congress about the conclusion of the investigation".


If confirmed by the Senate, Rosen would replace Rod Rosenstein and serve alongside the president's newly confirmed attorney general, William Barr.

Mr Trump has denied any collusion and repeatedly slammed the Russian Federation probe as a "witch hunt".

Katelyn Polantz, one of the three CNN reporters who broke the story, wrote on Twitter that the special counsel's office has been buzzing with activity as a winter storm paralyzes the Washington, DC metro area.

For another thing, if it is indeed the final report, Barr would then have to write his own report and deliver it to Congress, "and it's contemplated in the regulations that that report should be public, if the public administration of justice so requires".

Mueller was appointed after Trump abruptly fired Federal Bureau of Investigation director James Comey that same month. He gave $7,545 to Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney in 2012, and $100 to Senator Marco Rubio in 2015, a Trump rival for the GOP presidential nomination.

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