United States of America brought the first batch of military equipment from Syria

United States of America brought the first batch of military equipment from Syria

United States of America brought the first batch of military equipment from Syria

The announcement comes a day after Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu said a military operation in northern Syria against the Kurdish YPG militia, which is allied with the US, is not dependent on the withdrawal of American forces.

Removing equipment from Syria is thought to be a way the department of defense can show progress on that order without withdrawing troops.

President Donald Trump last month claimed the Islamic State group had been defeated and said U.S. troops would return home "now".

Presumably, it removed the equipment from the Northern regions of Syria.

Earlier this week, US National Security Advisor John Bolton laid out conditions for the pullout, including the defeat of the ISIS in Syria and guarantees for the safety of Washington's Kurdish allies in the campaign, who have been threatened with an imminent offensive by Turkey.

The US-led coalition, which also includes countries such as France and Britain, was formed in mid-2014 to counter the expansion of the Islamic State group after it proclaimed its self-styled "caliphate".

Earlier this week, the US national security adviser John Bolton said American troops will not leave northeastern Syria until IS is defeated and American-allied Kurdish fighters are protected, signaling a slowdown in Trump's initial order for a rapid withdrawal.


US troops have been involved in Syria's war since 2014 when the first elite force arrived in the country to advise Kurdish-led fighters who were involved in battles against the Islamic State group.

They also did not say what part of Syria it came from, though it is expected the drawdown would begin in the country's north.

Fighter jets and special forces have played a key role in efforts to claw back the territory lost to ISIS.

He said that Turkey and other countries in the middle East are able to resist the remnants of ISIS in Syria without the support of the American side.

A Kurdish-led group, the Syrian Democratic Forces, is now flushing out the very last pockets of land controlled by the jihadists in the Euphrates River Valley.

Opponents of the move claim that the pullout will allow Russia, Iran and the Syrian regime to expand their influence in the region.

Turkey views the US-backed YPG Syrian Kurdish militia as an extension of the Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK), which has waged a 34-year insurgency in Turkey for Kurdish political and cultural rights, mostly in southeastern areas near Syria. He spoke before the announcement on the USA withdrawal and did not address it.

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