Major League Baseball investigating Houston Astros' photographer during ALCS vs. Boston Red Sox

Major League Baseball investigating Houston Astros' photographer during ALCS vs. Boston Red Sox

Major League Baseball investigating Houston Astros' photographer during ALCS vs. Boston Red Sox

The Houston Astros may be defending more than their World Series title.

The Commissioner's Office confirmed that it investigated the presence of an Astros employee in the camera pit near the Red Sox dugout early in ALCS Game 1 at Fenway Park.

It's only been one game in Houston, and the Red Sox have already accomplished that, and in electrifying fashion as well.

After the man was removed another Astros staffer intervened - according to sources who were on the scene - and tried to convince security that he was authorized to be in the area next to the dugout.

But in a statement, it says they "consider the matter closed".


Bradley delivered the knockout punch to the Astros with the biggest hit of his career, making it an 8-2 lead for Boston to all but wrap up a victory in Game 3 and guaranteeing that the Red Sox can not lose this series without at least making a trip back home to Fenway Park first.

The Metro USA report noted that Major League Baseball security had been warned about the man because of "suspicious activity" in the ALDS against the Indians. To address those worries, the commissioner instituted a new prohibition on the use of certain in-stadium cameras, beefing up Major League Baseball security at games and monitoring video rooms. Sale was the primary option to start Thursday's Game 5 for the Red Sox, who lead the ALCS 2-1, but Cora said he is struggling to keep down solid food. "So I mean we do a good job changing sequences". Teams routinely try to gain an advantage by trying to detect patterns, whether it's a catcher showing signs to a pitcher on the mound or a third-base coach relaying signs to a batter. We try to slow it down.

The utilization of technology in sign-stealing efforts isn't likely to go away, and it'll continue to force teams and players into more rigorous efforts to protect signs.

"I'm aware of something going on, but I haven't been briefed", he told reporters.

The Indians entered the series concerned the Astros, who have been suspected of cheating in the past, had stolen some signs or had other useful information about them, one person said. Indians pitcher Trevor Bauer tweeted during the regular season that Houston's pitchers may have been using banned substances to improve the spin on their pitches. Bauer didn't provide any specifics but his insinuations triggered a social-media storm, which included responses from several Astros players, including pitchers Lance McCullers Jr. and Collin McHugh.

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