Eight children dead after adenovirus outbreak at medical centre in New Jersey

Eight children dead after adenovirus outbreak at medical centre in New Jersey

Eight children dead after adenovirus outbreak at medical centre in New Jersey

A ninth child has died in an adenovirus outbreak at the Wanaque Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation in New Jersey, according to the state's health department.

The facility has now confirmed that 25 patients have been affected by adenovirus - a respiratory virus that causes flu- or cold-like symptoms, but can be far more harmful to those who have compromised immune systems. Adenovirus hasn't been confirmed in another person who died Friday afternoon.

The for-profit facility has a pediatric centre and also cares for elderly residents.

The "medically fragile" child, whose identity was not made public, died late Saturday at the Wanaque Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation in Haskell, N.J., just one day after the facility's eighth death.

The teams will assess infection prevention practices and deploy beginning in November, according to Health Commissioner Dr. Shereef Elnahal.

It usually affects the respiratory system, but it can also cause gastroenteritis and conjunctivitis.


"Facility outbreaks are not always preventable, but in response to what we have seen in Wanaque, we are taking aggressive steps to minimize the chance they occur among the most vulnerable patients in New Jersey", Elnahal said in a statement. It said it did not have laboratory confirmation of adenovirus in the child. The facility has been barred from admitting new patients for the duration of the outbreak.

The US health department said the most recent individual to be diagnosed in the outbreak would have fallen ill on or before 22 October. "The strain has been particularly associated with disease in communal living arrangements and can be more severe", according to the health department.

The bacterium can cause pneumonia or serious blood or wound infections.

In the same report, the New Jersey spokeswoman Nicole Kirgan said children are particularly at risk with this virus.

The viruses themselves are also "resistant to many common disinfectants and can remain infectious for long periods on environmental surfaces and medical instruments", the CDC says.

"They cause principally a whole bunch of minor troublesome infections spread by children, often from children to adults", he said.

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