Zimbabwe's ruling party ZANU-PF wins majority seats in parliament

Zimbabwe's ruling party ZANU-PF wins majority seats in parliament

Zimbabwe's ruling party ZANU-PF wins majority seats in parliament

MDC did not immediately respond to the parliamentary results but earlier on Wednesday party leader and presidential contender Nelson Chamisa, 40, said the presidential results were being faked.

The MDC opposition alliance insist their candidate, Nelson Chamisa, beat the incumbent President Emmerson Mnangagwa. By Wednesday, he was declaring victory, thanking his supporters and saying his party has won the popular vote, without offering proof.

The Zimbabwe Electoral Commission's decision to delay announcing the results of the presidential race at least until Thursday - three days after the vote - seemed certain to bring more opposition anger if President Emmerson Mnangagwa is declared the victor.

A Harare-based political analyst with Zimbabwe Democracy Institute, Pedzisai Ruhanya, said that the results released so far could be a reflection of the will of the people but were not flawless.

He accused the commission of releasing the parliamentary results first to prepare Zimbabweans for a Mnangagwa victory.

Members of the Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) party are claiming that the elections have been rigged. "The process must be credible and transparent, then whoever wins this election, Zimbabwe can move on, and the people of Zimbabwe can be the real winners".

Both the opposition and Western election observers have urged that presidential election results be released as soon as possible.

Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe delivers a speech during a live broadcast at State House in Harare, November 19, 2017.

Correspondents stress that Wednesday's violence is confined to the centre of Harare - an opposition stronghold - while other parts of the country remain calm.


When Mugabe resigned last November, bowing to pressure from his former ally Mnangagwa and the military, observers both at home and overseas heralded Monday's general elections - which will decide presidential, parliamentary and local seats - as an opportunity for a clean slate.

More than five million people were registered to vote - with a high turnout of 70%.

The electoral commission has warned that results of the presidential first round may not be known until Friday or even Saturday and would not be released until tallies were received from all 10,985 polling stations.

The results of the presidential election, which is a separate contest pitting Mr Mnangagwa against Mr Chamisa, are yet to be declared, but the parliamentary results bode well for the incumbent.

However, Douglas Mwonzora, a top MDC Alliance official, told the BBC's Andrew Harding that the endorsement on Sunday of their candidate by Mr Mugabe had cost the party votes.

Priscilla Chigumba, a judge who heads the Zimbabwe Electoral Commission, said she was confident there had been no "cheating" in the first election without Mugabe on the ballot.

"The more the presidential vote is delayed, the more it calls into question the population's confidence in the election process", said former Liberian leader Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, the lead observer of a USA monitoring mission.

The BBC reports that the announcement on the presidential poll was not made because representatives of some of the 23 candidates had failed to turn up to verify the results.

The opposition alleges the elections have irregularities, saying voting results were not posted outside one-fifth of polling stations as required by law.

Related news



[an error occurred while processing the directive]