Ariana Grande to perform at Aretha Franklin’s memorial service

Ariana Grande to perform at Aretha Franklin’s memorial service

Ariana Grande to perform at Aretha Franklin’s memorial service

Journalists from The Associated Press were allowed to document the casket's movement Wednesday night after the public viewing concluded.

The Queen of Soul's public viewing continued Wednesday, with fans queuing festively outside, then walking solemnly and single file into the museum.

The Blank Space singer remembered the Queen of Soul while performing in her hometown of Detroit, where she now lays at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History after passing away earlier this month from advanced pancreatic cancer, aged 76.

The two-day viewing was part of a week of commemorations for the legend, who died August 16 of pancreatic cancer.

The funeral parlor have reportedly said Franklin will be dressed differently for each of the four days of celebration, which continues on Thursday with her coffin lying in repose at her father's New Bethel Baptist Church, where she hosted dinners and recorded an album.

Ellis grew up in Detroit with the Franklin family, and he will oversee her funeral on Friday.

A sea of women wearing black, many with African violet corsages and pearl necklaces lead a procession into the rotunda of the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History.


"Aretha Franklin was not only the Queen of Soul but also a civil rights icon and a champion for all Americans" access to health care", said AARP CEO Jo Ann Jenkins.

"I think it's going to be a time of sadness, a time of joy, a time of laughter, there's going to be some dancing", he told AFP.

Peggie Funny and her friend Mary A. Wilson, of Columbia, South Carolina, both born in 1954, came to Detroit for one day only on a whim because they wanted to pay their respects.

Grande joins an already packed lineup of performers for Franklin's funeral, including Stevie Wonder, Faith Hill, Jennifer Hudson, Pastor Shirley Caesar and The Clark Sisters among others. "As they saw the handwriting on the wall and that shade coming down on her life, they began to make some decisions on where her service might be", he said.

Ann Fortson, 63, said: "She was a symbol for us".

"I guess she touched so many hearts, you see people crying, you see people just smiling and singing her songs".

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