Aretha Franklin’s Public Viewing, Fans Mourn At The Charles H. Wright Museum

Aretha Franklin’s Public Viewing, Fans Mourn At The Charles H. Wright Museum

Aretha Franklin’s Public Viewing, Fans Mourn At The Charles H. Wright Museum

Franklin will be laid to rest at Detroit's Woodlawn Cemetery following an August 31 funeral at Greater Grace Temple, her family told the Detroit Free Press.

It's hard to separate the singer from the city, so you better think that her town is saying farewell in royal fashion to its Queen of Soul, with a concert, public viewings and a funeral that's expected to be attended by at least one former president, civil rights leaders and many other musical luminaries.

Denise Thimes was still a young girl when she first interacted with Aretha Franklin in St. Louis during the late '60s.

A public viewing for the Queen of Soul is being held in the rotunda of the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History.

Mourners poured into the museum to pay their final respects to Franklin, who died August 16 of pancreatic cancer at the age of 76.

She died surrounded by family and loved ones, following a battle with cancer.


This morning, fans lined in wait outside the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History in Detroit.

"When we were little girls, we would all dress up a little and sing her songs in the living room", said Teresa Massey Walker, 48, who came from Buffalo, New York, to pay her respects.

Paula Marie Seniors says the setting for the public viewings Tuesday and Wednesday couldn't be more fitting. The ceremony is open only to Delta's members and members of Franklin's family. The associate professor of Africana studies at Virginia Tech says Franklin is "being honored nearly like a queen at one of the most important black museums in the United States".

Howard, a fan of Franklin's since she was a child, told the Detroit Free Press that she arrived on the line at 6.30pm Monday and that Franklin was "royalty" and 'worth it'.

Civil rights icon Rosa Parks also lay in state at the same Detroit museum after she died in 2005. "She would take care of the expenses - and usually in full without being asked or prompted to do so". She says while she never met Franklin, it felt like she could be a sister or an aunt because "she's always been here". The lone, surviving original member of the quartet said he and his bandmates shared a special bond with Franklin on stages and in studios over the decades.

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