Flying car startup backed by Google founder Larry Page offers test flights

Flying car startup backed by Google founder Larry Page offers test flights

Flying car startup backed by Google founder Larry Page offers test flights

Another aircraft, called Cora, is probably more of what you'd picture when someone says "flying vehicle".

Kitty Hawk chief executive Sebastian Thrun, who founded the Google X lab devoted to "moonshots" such as self-driving cars and internet-synched eyewear, was quoted by CNN as saying piloting Flyer was as easy playing the video game "Minecraft".

The uncovered cockpit appears big enough for one person, with their head poking out as it might from a go-kart.

With the flying vehicle segment being more competitive than ever, we can expect to FLY in 5 years.

This test was a clear demonstration of how easy it would it be to fly a vehicle after a commercial model hits the market. She received one hour of training and then flew for five minutes at a blistering speed of 10 kph over water for safety. The company also seems to be suggesting it'll make flights available as a leisure experience, which strikes us as a great solution, particularly if the guys in charge quietly keep a remote control on hand in case a pilot gets out of their depth.

The Flyer is one of two major initiatives at Kitty Hawk.


The model is meant to be used for recreational purposes and is not to be utilized as a means of transportation.

The battery life on this flyer is quite small.

The company didn't say when the Flyer would go on sale or how much it would cost.

In a separate development, Bloomberg reported that Volocopter GmbH, a German startup backed by chipmaker Intel and automotive multinational Daimler AG, has developed an electric helicopter that will function as a taxi service to ferry commuters over congested cities. Details on this project are, however, scarce.

Flight time depends on environmental factors and if fat chaps like me are flying it, Kitty Hawk claim between 12 and 20 minutes. But the question remains - when will they really hit the market?

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